Friday, August 1, 2008

I hear from "an EEStor insider"

I have dubbed the alleged EEStor insiders who have been spilling the beans to bloggers, the Gnomes of Austin. The Gnomes of Austin, the EEStor insiders or people who claim to be insiders are certainly more communicative than in the past. And that communications is basically with bloggers. I found this comment by "Gnome Carl" this morning on one of my earlier EEStor pieces:

Pollution: Moving from individual engines to central electricity generating plants would mean a net decrease in overall pollution. Even getting pollution out of our crowded cities would be a gain for public health.

Charging: There's no need for five minute charging at home. If one needs to get a big quick boost, that can be provided at dedicated charging stations.

Dick Weir, founder and CEO of EEStor, told me a few weeks ago that there would be an announcement soon on permittivity of its barium titanite powder, considered a major benchmark that would trigger future payments to EEStor from ZENN, and I can only assume Kleiner Perkins as well.

My Comment: I am in complete agreement with the first statement, which I feel would be ample justification to switch transportation from fossil fuel power to electricity. Significant human health benefits would flow from the switch.

The second statement reflects the difference between ultra capacitors and batteries. Ultra capacitors can be charged very rapidly from a high current source.

The announcement of third party test attested results on the permittivity of its barium titanite powder would certainly add to the credibility of EEStor.

Finally I note Carl's claimed insider status by stating, "Dick Weir . . . told me a few weeks ago . . ." Not a test of a production EESU mind you. We are still in a world of shadows and whispers, but the whispers are getting louder. One more note, at the bottom of his comment Carl left me a little scoop:
http://eestor.biz/

Update: The EE Story makes the main stream media in Canada. The link (Carl provided) on closer inspection would appear to not be a genuine EEStor web page, so no scoop this time.

11 comments:

Steve said...

I looked all over the archives of this blog for a comment on EEstor by "Carl" and could not find one. Can you place a link to the comment which is the subject of this current EEstor update?

And, is that supposed to be the first picture of an EEstor ESU at the eestor.biz site? I must admit, I haven't seen that photo before. So, if that is the scoop, congratulations.

Steve, from the B blog

steve said...

the file estension for that pic at the eestor.biz site has "honda" in it...

steve said...

this is BS. you dont have a "scoop"

Charles Barton said...

Steve follow the tags. You will find the comment under the post here:
http://nucleargreen.blogspot.com/2008/06/ian-clifford-on-zenn-motors-and-eestor.html

Ya I cam to the conclusion that the site is not EEStor's. that is why I am a little suspicious about "Carl."

Charles Barton said...

Steve, You are slso probably right about my supposed scoop. Those Gnomes of Austin are sure tricky.

aaron said...

The picture comes from hondas website.

http://world.honda.com/FuelCell/FCX/ultracapacitor/

nice one.

aaron said...

The picture comes from hondas website.

http://world.honda.com/FuelCell/FCX/ultracapacitor/

nice one.

windbourne said...

Has anybody even read the eestor.biz site? It has ADs and speaks of eestor in 3rd person, for god sakes. Obviously it is not them.

Charles Barton said...

Arron. and windbourne, if you read my last up dat you will see what I say about the so called EEStor site, I wrote "The link (Carl provided) on closer inspection would appear to not be a genuine EEStor web page, so no scoop this time.

dmon said...

Charles, following up on point#1 (pollution reduction due to adoption of electric transportation). This has been posited repeatedly (best summary I've seen is at EcoGeek) and I don't doubt it. But another benefit people overlook is that a move to EVs will further reduce overall energy consumption by reducing the number of gas trucks distributing fuel to gas stations, proportionate to the reduced demand for gas.

Bring it on!

Charles Barton said...

dmon, Thank you for the information and the link. I did a case study of the consequences of switching from fossil fuel powered transportation. The advantages included saving on increasingly expensive fossil fuels. my conclusion that the switch could be largely paid for by the replacement costs for old and worn out vehicles, and by the fuel and health care savings that the switch would lead too. The switch would have a positive impact on electrical costs, since cars will be mainly charged up at night. This would tend to decrease the day night imbalance of Grid use.

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