Tuesday, August 26, 2008

From the Economist Energy Debate

My comment this morning:

We are still in an early phase of our love affair with renewables. The Philosopher Irving Singer noted that there are two typss of love. Love by bestowal and love by appraisal. In love by bestowal the lover confers on the beloved infinite worth, and can believe that the beloved is the source of all happiness and the solution to all problems. Love by appraisal acknowledges the beloved has flaws, but holds on a balanced appraisal that the beloved is still worthy of love.

At the moment discussions of energy solutions suffer from a failure on the part of renewable lovers to appraise the object of their love, that is renewable power systems. When criticisms of renewables are raised, advocates take a why are you attacking my beloved attitude. In contrast many renewables advocates who uncritical approach to renewables, often take a hyper critical attitude toward nuclear power. Critical thinking demands that both renewables and nuclear energy ought to be subjected to a single critical standard. Judgement ought not to be rendered until we have a balanced appraisal.

3 comments:

jimcrea said...

A hyper critical attitude toward all energy technology is prudent and must be expected and even demanded. I believe that, in the end, certain nuclear technologies will pass the test. However, the toll that perfection demands on the designers and engineers will be heavy. In this highest and most noble of efforts, mediocrity and moderation cannot be tolerated. Those men of genius that enter this fight do it not because it is easy but because it is hard. The human price will be high. Many heart attacks and nervous breakdowns are in the offing. But in every war, there are casualties and there are patriots that give the last full measure of devotion to the future of the nation. Let it not be said that their efforts were week, the motives impure, and that the price has not been paid in full measure.

jimcrea said...

Comment edit

Because of the impact on the future prospects and, indeed, the very existence of our civilization depends on the production and use of energy, a hyper critical attitude toward all energy technology is prudent and must be expected and even demanded. I believe that, in the end, certain nuclear technologies will pass this test. However, the toll that perfection demands on the designers and engineers will be heavy. In this highest and most noble of efforts, mediocrity and moderation cannot be tolerated.

Those men of genius that enter this fight do it not because it is easy but because it is hard. The human price to be paid will be high; the sacrifice great. Many heart attacks and nervous breakdowns are in the offing. But in every war, there are casualties and there are patriots that give the last full measure of devotion to the enduring future of the nation. In this long struggle toward perfection, let it not be said that their efforts were weak, the motives impure, and that the price has not been paid in full measure. Even though the march of time will erase the memories of these few and special men from the mind of posterity, their work will forever endure as a shining and priceless jewel in the many and wondrous achievements of all mankind.

Warren Heath said...

Speaking of Noble Efforts, a Selfless Hero of Humankind, sticking it out to the very end to save this Great Earth and its People, Dr. Robert Bussard will go down in History as one of the Giants of Human Civilization.

Dr. Robert Bussard, his legacy will be Abundant, Cheap, Clean Energy for all of Humanity – Forever!

A 100 MW net power fusion reactor could be built for $20 million

Google Video on the Bussard Reactor

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